Different types of trademark

It is important to think about how your company should be represented to be perceived the way you would like: with a word, a figure or a sound? Read more about the different types of trademarks here.

Word mark

A word mark consists of one or more words, for example Japp or Marco Polo. It can also be combinations of numbers or letters, like SVT or 3RT.

The word mark is always registered in a standard font. This means that if you want to protect a word in a specific font, you have to apply for a figurative mark.

See example of one word mark, Carolina Klüft

Figurative mark/logotype

Figurative marks are the trademarks that consists of just a figure or a figure combined with one or more words. Words in a specific font are also considered figurative. Figurative marks can be registered in black and white or in colour.

See example of one figurative mark, Ica

Three-dimensional mark

If the product itself or the product’s packaging have a special shape, for example a perfume bottle or a liqueur bottle, you may be able to register it as a three-dimensional mark. The shape has to be significantly different from what is known on the market for a three-dimensional mark to be registered.

Sound mark

A sound can be a trademark and can therefore also be registered. A sound mark is a sound or a melody with a distinct recognition effect. A well-known sound mark is the melody owned by Hemglass. When applying for a sound mark the mark can be represented by a sound file or by an exact description of the sound in notation.

See example of one sound mark, Hemglass

Motion mark

A mark where parts of the trademark are shifting, changing or moving. One example of a motion mark is an animated logotype. When applying for a motion mark the mark can be represented either by a video file or a series of still images that show the motion.

Multimedia mark

A mark that consists of a combination of sound and picture. The mark can be represented by an audio-visual file that shows the combination of sound and picture.

Hologram mark

A mark where a three-dimensional picture is shown using holographic technique, for example a rotating logotype. When applying for a hologram mark the mark can be represented by a video file or a series of still images that show the variation of the hologram and the holographic effects.

Position mark

A position mark consists of a specific placement of a trademark on a product. A position mark can be represented by an image that shows how the mark is positioned and what size and proportion it has compared to the product it is placed on. The parts that are not included in the exclusive right should be separated from the trademark in the representation, for example by dashed or broken lines. 

Pattern mark

A continuous pattern can be protected as a pattern mark. It can be represented by an image that shows the pattern and how it is repeated. The applicant can also attach a description of how the pattern is repeated, along with the representation.